Son Of David, Have Mercy On Me.

Services

Sunday 10:30 AM Worship Service | Wednesday - 6:30 PM Bible Study

by: Tim Olson

10/05/2020

0

If you know anything abut me, you will know that I love a song called "Son of David" by Ghostship. You can check out their webpage here:     https://www.ghostshipmusic.com/

They sing some songs that are inspire me to enter into deep worship of the King of kings. One song in particular is called "Son Of David". 




The title “Son of David” is found on the lips of various people in the gospel accounts, for example, a blind beggar sitting near the road:


When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” (Mark 10:47).


I think David Mathis said it best in this article he wrote in April of 2017.

The mercy of God is one of the most precious realities in the world, one of the most revealing themes in all the Bible, and one of the most tragically misunderstood truths about God. If you want to know who God really is, if you want to peek into his heart, it is not the display of his just wrath and cosmic power to which you should look. Rather, set your eye on his mercy, without minimizing the fullness of his might, and take in the life-changing panorama.

Many of us today are prone, by nature and nurture, to see God’s mercy as peripheral or incidental to who he is. We suspect that perhaps he shows mercy by accident or weakness. But if we let the Scriptures have their say, we will see that when God shows his mercy, he does so with utter intentionality and strength, and we as his creatures get our deepest glimpse of who he is not just in his sovereignty but his goodness. Not simply in his greatness but his gentleness. Not only in his towering might but also in his surprising tenderness.

But God’s mercy not only shows us who he is, but also tells us something essential about ourselves. That we have been shown mercy means not only that we didn’t deserve his favor, but that we deserved his righteous hammer against the anvil of justice. Our cry for mercy admits to our ill-deserving, not just undeserving. By rights, we should be under his impending wrath, like all mankind (Ephesians 2:3) — but for the “the tender mercy of our God” (Luke 1:78).

But we are not the first to peer into his heart and catch a glimpse of his fatherly posture toward us. God has made the world to turn again and again on fresh revelations of his mercy.

Our God is not simply sovereign, wonderful as it is to celebrate. And he is not only a God of uncompromising justice, thankful as we are that he is. He is the mercy-having God who invites us to look not only at his awesome authority and sovereign strength, but to set our eyes on his mercy and see into his very heart.


Entrust yourself to the God who has mercy.




If you know anything abut me, you will know that I love a song called "Son of David" by Ghostship. You can check out their webpage here:     https://www.ghostshipmusic.com/

They sing some songs that are inspire me to enter into deep worship of the King of kings. One song in particular is called "Son Of David". 




The title “Son of David” is found on the lips of various people in the gospel accounts, for example, a blind beggar sitting near the road:


When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to cry out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” (Mark 10:47).


I think David Mathis said it best in this article he wrote in April of 2017.

The mercy of God is one of the most precious realities in the world, one of the most revealing themes in all the Bible, and one of the most tragically misunderstood truths about God. If you want to know who God really is, if you want to peek into his heart, it is not the display of his just wrath and cosmic power to which you should look. Rather, set your eye on his mercy, without minimizing the fullness of his might, and take in the life-changing panorama.

Many of us today are prone, by nature and nurture, to see God’s mercy as peripheral or incidental to who he is. We suspect that perhaps he shows mercy by accident or weakness. But if we let the Scriptures have their say, we will see that when God shows his mercy, he does so with utter intentionality and strength, and we as his creatures get our deepest glimpse of who he is not just in his sovereignty but his goodness. Not simply in his greatness but his gentleness. Not only in his towering might but also in his surprising tenderness.

But God’s mercy not only shows us who he is, but also tells us something essential about ourselves. That we have been shown mercy means not only that we didn’t deserve his favor, but that we deserved his righteous hammer against the anvil of justice. Our cry for mercy admits to our ill-deserving, not just undeserving. By rights, we should be under his impending wrath, like all mankind (Ephesians 2:3) — but for the “the tender mercy of our God” (Luke 1:78).

But we are not the first to peer into his heart and catch a glimpse of his fatherly posture toward us. God has made the world to turn again and again on fresh revelations of his mercy.

Our God is not simply sovereign, wonderful as it is to celebrate. And he is not only a God of uncompromising justice, thankful as we are that he is. He is the mercy-having God who invites us to look not only at his awesome authority and sovereign strength, but to set our eyes on his mercy and see into his very heart.


Entrust yourself to the God who has mercy.




cancel save

0 Comments on this post:

Plan your visit